BOOK REVIEW | Pet Sematary by Stephen King

5/5 stars

This may be my favorite Stephen King book to date – a book that King himself describes as too much, the one time he feels he crossed a line. I have a lot of King left to read, but I can understand why this one stands out for many super fans.

Louis Creed, his wife Rachel, and kids Ellie and Gage move to a quiet neighborhood in rural Maine. Louis immediately warms to the elderly couple that lives across the street, even describing Jud as the father he should have had. It’s an idyllic picture, but Jud warns the Creeds to be mindful of the commercial trucks that frequently speed through the area, suggesting they keep their pet cat close. Jud takes the family on a tour of the forested areas near the house, and they come upon a graveyard where kids burry their pets after they die – the pet sematary. The burial ground is believed to have some sort of power and when tragedy occurs, Louis will soon discover this to be true.

Reading this book as a mom to young boys was no easy task – I knew what was coming, yet dreaded it with every flip of the page. King takes every parent’s greatest fear, the loss of a child, and weaves it into a tale so dark and disturbing, yet utterly compelling. This is a great story, as well as a great scary story. Louis’ transformation into a father obsessed is a huge part of what drives the last third of the book – will he really go as far as the plot suggests? Jud had warned him, after all: sometimes dead is better. Horror readers won’t be disappointed either – there’s plenty of truly frightening moments within its pages. It takes a lot to scare me, but I had to take pause on more than one occasion.

This is a book that almost didn’t get published, but I’m certainly glad it did. It’s difficult to read, but horror that you can relate to is arguably the best kind. I finally get to watch the original movie, and look forward to the remake in 2019!

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BOOK REVIEW | Heart-Shaped Box by Joe Hill

3/5 stars

I finished this up a couple weeks ago, but have had no time to write down my thoughts. I’m finally playing catch up! Here’s a quick review to get myself back up to speed.

Judas Coyne, the now middle-aged front-man of a popular metal band, is obsessed with collecting macabre items. He has sketches from serial killer John Wayne Gacey, a trepanned skull…even a snuff film. When he discovers a ghost for sale on an auction site, he can’t help but place a bid and purchase it. Judas soon receives a black, heart-shaped box in the mail which contains a suit said to house the spirit of a deceased man named Craddock. Turns out, Craddock is the stepfather of a young groupie that committed suicide after a past fling with Judas, and he is angry, vengeful, and hell-bent on killing the rockstar.

Hill shines in ability to take an unlikable character and build him up to someone we can root for. Initially Judas is not someone I felt invested in, there was nothing particularly interesting about him, and he refers to his girlfriends by the states they are from, rather than their actual names (Florida, Georgia, etc), which is just plain rude. I didn’t hate him, but didn’t like him either. Throughout the story, we get to see him evolve, his current girlfriend having a significant role in his change in character. As he learns more about her and her past, he also learns more about the girl who committed suicide, coming to realizations about how he has treated the people in his life.

This was not my favourite Hill – nothing can top NOS4A2 – but it’s certainly as unique and wild of a story as expected from this amazing writer. His stories are always such a blast!

BOOK REVIEW | Hidden Bodies by Caroline Kepnes

4/5 stars

This book was everything I wanted out of You – a biting satire that is equal parts creepy and funny. Kepnes hits the nail on the head with this one, though I will say that I went into her work expecting to be truly terrified. I guess I just had the wrong perception, as her work is much more comedic than it is scary.

In Hidden Bodies Joe is back but this time he’s in Los Angeles. Joe holds a grudge, and after being played the fool in his last relationship he heads to LA to settle the score the only way he knows how. When in LA, Joe hobnobs with actors and others trying to make it in Hollywood, blending in surprisingly well. He’s good looking and great with people, and soon finds himself in a new and meaningful relationship with a woman named Love. But Joe can’t help looking backwards, obsessing over a critical error he made in one of his last crimes, wondering when it will all catch up with him. Combine that with Love’s destructive twin brother, a cop who won’t back down, an ultimate desire for success, and the stage is set for a perfect storm.

There are some genuinely laugh-out-loud moments in this book as Kepnes digs into the absurdity that is celebrity life in LA. There is an element missing that would take this story to the next level; I don’t like Joe – he’s arrogant, pretentious, and overly confident. That said, this is an endlessly entertaining read that I moved through quickly. I think if I liked his character I’d be more into these books. I’ll definitely continue to check out Kepnes’ work – she has a new book out now.

BOOK REVIEW | The Dark Tower #1 – The Gunslinger by Stephen King


4/5 stars

This book is so difficult to review, so I’m not really going to review it. Stephen King is a master of his craft, and the first book in the Dark Tower series is no joke.

This book focuses on word building and filling in backstory; sort of a 200 page prologue. There is so much going on in this short book that it’s almost difficult to comprehend. I want to continue with this series but may need to read this again first.

What surprised me the most is how violent and gory this book is – for some reason I suspected a bit of a lighter fantasy. Nope, this is classic King.

We follow the Gunslinger as he follows The Man in Black. Along the way he meets a boy from another time / dimension. That’s, more or less, the point of this book. We also learn a bit about the Gunslinger’s past and relationship to the man in black.

I’ll be circling back to this book in 2018 if I decide to take on the entire series. I’m not a fan of fantasy (too realistic and cynical I guess), but I’ve always wanted to tackle these books.

BOOK REVIEW | A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay

A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay.jpg

4/5 stars

I am so behind on book reviews and am trying to get caught up before 2017 ends, so I’ll keep this brief!

I am a horror fanatic but, admittedly, not a huge fan of exorcism stories. I’m not sure why, but they have never been my go-to for horror, and I rarely find them genuinely scary. In A Head Full of Ghosts, Tremblay takes the familiar exorcism narrative and flips it on its head. Clearly a fan of the genre, I felt like I was reading the work of someone who did their homework, and I mean that in the best way possible!

We follow the Barrett family as they search for the root of 14 year old Marjorie’s sudden strange behaviour. It she acting out as teenagers often do? Is it mental illness? Or is this a genuine possession? It all starts years after the drama, when Marjorie’s younger sister, Merry, is being interviewed by a best-selling author for a tell-all about her family’s experience. Take everything you know about demons and exorcism, and add in a reality TV scenario along with a complicated family dynamic and you’ve got the makings of a great book. Through unique blog entries, Tremblay is able to dive deep into the business of making horror movies, and I must say I flagged many pages so that I can remember to check out some of the iconic scenes he mentions later.

I loved this book and I’m glad that I went for it, regardless of my fatigue with exorcism stories. This is a great addition to the horror section of my bookshelf!

BOOK REVIEW | Final Girls by Riley Sager

Final Girls by Riley Sager

3.5/5

I’m a huge fan of slasher movies. Huge. For me, the ultimate in horror is a crazed maniac, yielding a knife, hell-bent on plunging it into you. Yet, I love those movies, and with Halloween right around the corner I get giddy with excitement thinking about some of the classic horror I’ll be watching soon – I’m not sure what that says about me. Who is scarier than Michael Myers? No one. The answer is no one. When I heard about Final Girls, a book marketed for fans of slasher films, I knew I would be picking it up as soon as it was released.

This is the story of the last women standing. After any slasher movie style bloody massacre, there is always a single woman who survives. Final Girls seeks to tell the story of three of these women, all who endured, and survived, the unthinkable. Sam, Lisa, and our narrator, Quincy, are bound by their similar experiences, though they all handle the other side of their trauma uniquely.

I liked this book, I really did! I found myself wrapped up in the lives of these women, and it’s an easy story to get lost in. This is a twisty book, but all fairly predictable. I called certain elements right away, though there was one pretty major reveal that I didn’t see coming. Much like many of the thriller / horror books that I have read lately, I didn’t find it scary. I don’t know if it was meant to be scary, but it was a really solid and enjoyable thriller. If you go into this book know that it is not a slasher book, it is a thriller about the women who a massacre.

A fun, engrossing read that fans of thrillers will be sure to enjoy.

BOOK REVIEW | The Shining by Stephen King

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4.5/5 stars

From the publisher:
Jack Torrance’s new job at the Overlook Hotel is the perfect chance for a fresh start. As the off-season caretaker at the atmospheric old hotel, he’ll have plenty of time to spend reconnecting with his family and working on his writing. But as the harsh winter weather sets in, the idyllic location feels ever more remote . . . and more sinister. And the only one to notice the strange and terrible forces gathering around the Overlook is Danny Torrance, a uniquely gifted five-year-old.

My thoughts:
Man, Stephen King can tell a story like no one else. The Shining was a (creepy and terrifying) pleasure to read. It has been so much fun working through the King’s catalogue!

The world’s a hard place, Danny. It don’t care. It don’t hate you and me, but it don’t love us either. Terrible things happen in the world, and they’re things no one can explain. Good people die in bad, painful ways and leave the folks that love them all alone. Sometimes it seems like it’s only the bad people who stay healthy and prosper.

Jack Torrence is a recovering alcoholic and down on his luck. He’s lost his teaching job, but needs to take care of his family. A friend sets him up with a job as the winter caretaker at the Overlook Hotel, and he quickly accepts. Jack moves into the hotel with his wife, Wendy, and son, Danny. Danny has always been special – he can shine. His ability to shine means he can read people’s thoughts and you guessed it – see dead people. Shortly after arriving at the Overlook, Jack discovers details of the hotel’s history and some of the crimes that occurred there. Many presences haunt the Overlook, and the hotel slowly begins to manipulate Jack, ultimately turning him against his family.

Jack is a fantastic villain – I didn’t know if his words were his own, or a part of the hotel’s manipulation. It always sort of felt like a combination of both, that the hotel brought out his inner demons, rather than completely overtaking him. Nothing is scarier than the devil you know, right?

I’d love to know what happens to Danny, so may jump right in to Doctor Sleep!