BOOK REVIEW | Hidden Bodies by Caroline Kepnes

4/5 stars

This book was everything I wanted out of You – a biting satire that is equal parts creepy and funny. Kepnes hits the nail on the head with this one, though I will say that I went into her work expecting to be truly terrified. I guess I just had the wrong perception, as her work is much more comedic than it is scary.

In Hidden Bodies Joe is back but this time he’s in Los Angeles. Joe holds a grudge, and after being played the fool in his last relationship he heads to LA to settle the score the only way he knows how. When in LA, Joe hobnobs with actors and others trying to make it in Hollywood, blending in surprisingly well. He’s good looking and great with people, and soon finds himself in a new and meaningful relationship with a woman named Love. But Joe can’t help looking backwards, obsessing over a critical error he made in one of his last crimes, wondering when it will all catch up with him. Combine that with Love’s destructive twin brother, a cop who won’t back down, an ultimate desire for success, and the stage is set for a perfect storm.

There are some genuinely laugh-out-loud moments in this book as Kepnes digs into the absurdity that is celebrity life in LA. There is an element missing that would take this story to the next level; I don’t like Joe – he’s arrogant, pretentious, and overly confident. That said, this is an endlessly entertaining read that I moved through quickly. I think if I liked his character I’d be more into these books. I’ll definitely continue to check out Kepnes’ work – she has a new book out now.

BOOK REVIEW | You by Caroline Kepnes

3/5 stars

I had a lot of trouble deciding where to place this review. Part of me wanted to leave it at 2 stars, but there are good elements to this book that led me to 3.

Joe is a bookseller with demons. When Beck walks into his shop one day, he knows that she is the one. He stalks her, and eventually finds a ways to weasel himself into her life. The two bond and develop a relationship, but she is never fully committed. Joe disturbingly explains away the reasons for her indiscretions and behaviour, but decides there are people in Beck’s life that are taking her focus away from their relationship. With those people gone, she will only have him to turn to; so he sets out to remove those people.

I’m not sure if it’s the political climate we’re in, but I really wasn’t in the mood to read another book about a man inflicting violence (or worse) on a woman. Yes, Joe is equal opportunity in regards to gender, but something about this book just didn’t sit well with me.

Kepnes wants you to know what she likes, and the relentless name dropping in this book gets tired very quickly. Within a couple of chapters, I started to wonder how long it would keep up; the answer is for the entire book. Kepnes name drops books, authors, movies, music, music videos, bands, actors, and directors throughout the novel, and it quickly goes from being sort of fun to utterly gag-worthy. Sorry, but this sort of overtly pretentious vanity is hard to stomach.

I get it – Kepnes is going for a bit of satire with this – a serial killer who likes to keep up with the arts and the New York scene. That said, I have trouble believing that someone as twisted as Joe would be serving up Larabars to his victims. I will be starting on the follow up to this, Hidden Bodies, next, primarily because I’ve heard that she gets the satire right with that one. Kepnes wrote a compelling story with You, but it’s shortcomings were hard to ignore.