BOOK REVIEW | Foe by Ian Reid

 

*I received a digital advanced review copy from Simon and Schuster via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

 Release date: August 7, 2018

4/5 stars

No writer confounds and surprises like Ian Reid. His books keep you guessing and on the edge of your seat. This book is particularly bizarre, but I read I’m Thinking of Ending Things very recently, so I knew what to expect: philosophical debate disguised by an eerie story in which all is not as it seems.

Junior and Hen have a quiet, rural life together. They work hard, feed the chickens, and enjoy their evenings together. One day, a man named Terrance appears at the farm with a strange announcement – Junior has been long-listed for a potential trip away from Hen via a research project called OuterMore. Terrance leaves, but says he’ll be seeing them again soon. A year or so later, Terrance returns with the news that Junior has been officially selected and will be leaving for the OuterMore project for an unknown amount of time. Terrance moves in with them to prepare and research for the trip. And that’s about all I can say.

Books like this are meant for going in blind -learn as little as you can before diving in, and then enjoy the ride. Reid is asking some big and often contemplated questions here – how well can you truly know another person? How well can you truly know yourself? Where is technology leading us, and is all advancement positive? What is the essence of lasting relationships? What is up with the horned rhinoceros beetle?! Ok, this last one may be one of my lingering questions…

I have to admit that I caught on to the big twist long before it’s reveal, though I wasn’t expecting the second twist right at the end. I don’t want to spoil this book for anyone, but know that Reid not only carefully crafts his words, but makes subtle stylistic choices that can be revealing. This is for those who enjoy thinking about a book long after it ends, and who are comfortable with an artistic storyline. This book doesn’t wrap up nicely at all, in fact the ending is completely open for continuation. My only criticism of this book is that it could have been longer, gone deeper, explored further. I can’t rate this as high as ITOET, as it doesn’t pack quite the gut wrenching, emotional punch that his first novel did. Reid may very well be one of my favorite new (and Canadian!) authors.

Advertisements

BOOK REVIEW | The Favorie Sister by Jessica Knoll

*I received a digital advanced reader copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

No rating, DNF.

Unfortunately this book was not for me, and I discontinued reading at 31%. It’s very rare that I don’t finish a book, but each sitting felt like a slog, and there wasn’t anything going on that held my interest. I appreciate what Jessica Knoll is trying to do with The Favorite Sister, but it wasn’t coming together for me. This far into the book, there had been no plot advancement – just women being cruel to each other. Please don’t let this discourage you from picking it up! While it wasn’t for me, it may be exactly what you’re looking for. Thank you so much to Netgalley and Simon and Schuster for this advanced copy, I look forward to reviewing more books soon!

BOOK REVIEW | Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward

IMG_4870.JPG

4/5 stars

Release Date: September 5, 2017

*I received a digital advanced reader copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

From the publisher:
A searing and profound Southern odyssey by National Book Award–winner Jesmyn Ward.

In Jesmyn Ward’s first novel since her National Book Award–winning Salvage the Bones, this singular American writer brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first-century America. Drawing on Morrison and Faulkner, The Odyssey and the Old Testament, Ward gives us an epochal story, a journey through Mississippi’s past and present that is both an intimate portrait of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle. Ward is a major American writer, multiply awarded and universally lauded, and in Sing, Unburied, Sing she is at the height of her powers.

Jojo and his toddler sister, Kayla, live with their grandparents, Mam and Pop, and the occasional presence of their drug-addicted mother, Leonie, on a farm on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. Leonie is simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she’s high; Mam is dying of cancer; and quiet, steady Pop tries to run the household and teach Jojo how to be a man. When the white father of Leonie’s children is released from prison, she packs her kids and a friend into her car and sets out across the state for Parchman farm, the Mississippi State Penitentiary, on a journey rife with danger and promise.

Sing, Unburied, Sing grapples with the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power, and limitations, of the bonds of family. Rich with Ward’s distinctive, musical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing is a majestic new work and an essential contribution to American literature.

My thoughts:
Sing, Unburied, Sing presents a way of life that will be unfamiliar to many of its readers. A life in which addiction rules and heartbreak abounds. Jesmyn Ward presents themes and ideas, however, that are as relevant today as they ever have been; racism, injustices in the prison system, police treatment of minorities, and how the past shapes the present. This is the story of a family living in poverty along the Gulf Coast of Mississippi.

Through multiple perspectives, Ward tells us the story of Jojo and his toddler sister Kayla who are being raised by their grandparents, Mam and Pop. Jojo’s mother, Leoni, is often absent and frequently high. When Leoni gets a call that Michael, Jojo and Kayla’s father, is going to be released from prison, she packs the kids up and head’s out onto the road to pick him up on his release day. Jojo, who has just turned 13, is less than excited to be reacquainted with the stranger that is his father.

Leoni is haunted by visions of her deceased brother, and Jojo is haunted by a young boy Pop knew in his youth during his time in prison. Ward carries these figures elegantly throughout the story, and they become central to Leoni and Jojo’s fates. Ward doesn’t hold back in her depiction of prison as slavery, and this storyline comes to a truly heart wrenching and tragic end. This book is wrought with pain and sadness, and I know I will be thinking about Jojo for a while.

This was my first time reading Jesmyn Ward, and I certainly understand her success. She has keen insights and a strong voice, and I am looking forward to reading her backlist.

BOOK REVIEW | Faithful by Alice Hoffman

Faithful by Alice Hoffman

4/5 stars

*I received a digital advanced reader copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

From the publisher:
Growing up on Long Island, Shelby Richmond is an ordinary girl until one night an extraordinary tragedy changes her fate. Her best friend’s future is destroyed in an accident, while Shelby walks away with the burden of guilt.

What happens when a life is turned inside out? When love is something so distant it may as well be a star in the sky? Faithful is the story of a survivor, filled with emotion—from dark suffering to true happiness—a moving portrait of a young woman finding her way in the modern world. A fan of Chinese food, dogs, bookstores, and men she should stay away from, Shelby has to fight her way back to her own future. In New York City she finds a circle of lost and found souls—including an angel who’s been watching over her ever since that fateful icy night.

Here is a character you will fall in love with, so believable and real and endearing, that she captures both the ache of loneliness and the joy of finding yourself at last. For anyone who’s ever been a hurt teenager, for every mother of a daughter who has lost her way, Faithful is a roadmap.

My thoughts:
This book had me in tears more than once, it’s a truly beautiful piece of work. Shelby is flawed, tragic, hopeful, and I absolutely loved her. Her affinity for animals and what she does for them is the perfect insight into who she could have been before the tragedy, and who I hope she will become.

This was my first Alice Hoffman, and definitely won’t be my last. Thank you again to Simon & Schuster and NetGalley!

Publication date: November 1, 2016
Pre-order on Amazon

BOOK REVIEW | Aftermath by George Weinstein

Aftermath by George Weinstein

2/5 stars

*I received a digital advanced reader copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

From the publisher:
Janet Wright left tiny Graylee, Georgia at five, when her mother fled a destructive marriage. Now forty and reinventing herself after a failed engagement, Janet returns as the sole inheritor of her recently murdered father’s valuable estate. Life should be easy, but she can’t resist pulling at the threads of the apparently open-and-shut case. Before long, she finds herself tangled in Graylee’s web of secrets, lies, and scandals — and in fear of her own life.

My thoughts:
Aftermath started off really well and I was drawn right into the story. Pretty quickly, however, I started to notice the bizarre sarcastic dialogue between Janet and Tim. It was sort of cute at first, but this level of sarcasm cannot be sustained throughout an entire book without totally grating on the nerves. The dialogue just felt so unnatural with every single character. The mystery was interesting enough to keep me reading, but I nearly quit this one a few times because I couldn’t stand the dialogue. A big thanks to NetGalley and the Deeds Publishing for the copy!

Publication date: August 9, 2016

Book Review | The Summer that Melted Everything by Tiffany McDaniel

The Summer that Melted Everything by Tiffany McDaniel

5/5 stars

*I received a digital advanced reader copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. 

From the publisher:
Fielding Bliss has never forgotten the summer of 1984: the year a heat wave scorched Breathed, Ohio. The year he became friends with the devil.

Sal seems to appear out of nowhere – a bruised and tattered thirteen-year-old boy claiming to be the devil himself answering an invitation. Fielding Bliss, the son of a local prosecutor, brings him home where he’s welcomed into the Bliss family, assuming he’s a runaway from a nearby farm town.

When word spreads that the devil has come to Breathed, not everyone is happy to welcome this self-proclaimed fallen angel. Murmurs follow him and tensions rise, along with the temperatures as an unbearable heat wave rolls into town right along with him. As strange accidents start to occur, riled by the feverish heat, some in the town start to believe that Sal is exactly who he claims to be. While the Bliss family wrestles with their own personal demons, a fanatic drives the town to the brink of a catastrophe that will change this sleepy Ohio backwater forever.

My thoughts:
This book is absolutely amazing. It’s beautiful, sad, dark, and touches on many challenging and polarizing topics. McDaniel’s ability to work through difficult or controversial topics draws similarities to my favourite author, John Irving (though their prose is nothing alike).

It’s difficult to say much about The Summer that Melted Everything without giving significant moments away, but I will say that I have never highlighted so many quotes from a single book! This book features one of the most touching moments between a mother and son that I’ve ever read – those who have read it will know what I am talking about.

The Summer that Melted Everything will probably go down as my favourite release of 2016 – I will be picking this up in hardcover soon, and plan to re-read this many times in the future. Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for the copy, I’m already looking forward to Tiffany McDaniel’s next book!