BOOK REVIEW | You by Caroline Kepnes

3/5 stars

I had a lot of trouble deciding where to place this review. Part of me wanted to leave it at 2 stars, but there are good elements to this book that led me to 3.

Joe is a bookseller with demons. When Beck walks into his shop one day, he knows that she is the one. He stalks her, and eventually finds a ways to weasel himself into her life. The two bond and develop a relationship, but she is never fully committed. Joe disturbingly explains away the reasons for her indiscretions and behaviour, but decides there are people in Beck’s life that are taking her focus away from their relationship. With those people gone, she will only have him to turn to; so he sets out to remove those people.

I’m not sure if it’s the political climate we’re in, but I really wasn’t in the mood to read another book about a man inflicting violence (or worse) on a woman. Yes, Joe is equal opportunity in regards to gender, but something about this book just didn’t sit well with me.

Kepnes wants you to know what she likes, and the relentless name dropping in this book gets tired very quickly. Within a couple of chapters, I started to wonder how long it would keep up; the answer is for the entire book. Kepnes name drops books, authors, movies, music, music videos, bands, actors, and directors throughout the novel, and it quickly goes from being sort of fun to utterly gag-worthy. Sorry, but this sort of overtly pretentious vanity is hard to stomach.

I get it – Kepnes is going for a bit of satire with this – a serial killer who likes to keep up with the arts and the New York scene. That said, I have trouble believing that someone as twisted as Joe would be serving up Larabars to his victims. I will be starting on the follow up to this, Hidden Bodies, next, primarily because I’ve heard that she gets the satire right with that one. Kepnes wrote a compelling story with You, but it’s shortcomings were hard to ignore.

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BOOK REVIEW | The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith

5/5 stars

I’ve loved The Talented Mr. Ripley since the movie was released in 1999, and have been meaning to read the book ever since. I finally picked it up, and what a reading experience it was! I absolutely adored this book from the first page to the last, and can’t wait to watch the movie again to compare the two.

Tom Ripley is a fraudster – he tricks people into sending him cheques rather than the bank, and is genuinely proud of himself whenever he pulls off a deception. There is a sense of longing for more: bigger stunts and riskier plans are on the horizon. When an opportunity arises for Tom to go to Italy to convince playboy Dickie Greenleaf to come home to America, all expenses paid by Dickie’s concerned father, he jumps at the opportunity.

Once in Mongibello, the small Italian town where Dickie has been living, he intentionally bumps into Dickie and his girlfriend Marge, convincing them that he is an old friend. Dickie and Marge invite Tom into their home, and Tom soon realizes that he quite likes the life Dickie is leading – maybe he’d like to live this way too. A chance to make an easy dollar soon turns into a frightening obsession, and eventually to murder. What follows is a complex and expertly plotted tale of escape in plain sight. Tom Ripley is a sick genius, able to manipulate any narrative to suit his own.

Highsmith masterfully delves into the mind of a psychopath; early in the book she details a moment in which Tom rubs his hands together while laughing quietly to himself after pulling off fraud, and it’s so deliciously creepy that I knew I was in for a good ride. Throughout the story, it’s easy to both sympathize with and be disgusted by Tom; Tom’s is able to convince himself so thoroughly of his version of events that it’s easy to forget what really happened. My only critique is that it ends so abruptly – I guess I’ll have to pick up Ripley Underground soon!

BOOK REVIEW | Tangerine by Christine Mangan

3/5 stars

Obsession takes stage in Tangerine. This is a dark story of a friendship gone terribly wrong, resulting in both tragedy and despair.

College roommates Alice and Lucy had a tumultuous friendship, but developed a close bond regardless. When tragedy occurs the women go in different directions, leaving behind their plans for the future. A year later, the women unexpectedly reunite in Tangier, Morocco. As the story unfolds, we learn that Lucy has dark motivations, ultimately leading Alice down a disturbing, black hole. The book is also littered with references to how exotic Tangier is, how bright and colourful the clothing is, etc. The story is about a sheltered woman in the 1950’s, but I found the romanticizing of Morocco to be a little tiresome.

Reading this book alongside of The Talented Mr. Ripley gave me whiplash – Mangan was clearly influenced by the amazing Patricia Highsmith. The parallels between the two books are uncanny, though the stories do eventually go down different paths. Highsmith actually mentions Tangier as a place where one of her characters may have ran off to, so it’s incredibly difficult to appreciate this in its own right when it’s so heavily borrowed. Mangan has something good going here though, and I look forward to checking out her future work with hopes that she will find her own voice along the way.

BOOK REVIEW | The Favorie Sister by Jessica Knoll

*I received a digital advanced reader copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

No rating, DNF.

Unfortunately this book was not for me, and I discontinued reading at 31%. It’s very rare that I don’t finish a book, but each sitting felt like a slog, and there wasn’t anything going on that held my interest. I appreciate what Jessica Knoll is trying to do with The Favorite Sister, but it wasn’t coming together for me. This far into the book, there had been no plot advancement – just women being cruel to each other. Please don’t let this discourage you from picking it up! While it wasn’t for me, it may be exactly what you’re looking for. Thank you so much to Netgalley and Simon and Schuster for this advanced copy, I look forward to reviewing more books soon!

BOOK REVIEW | The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

4/5 stars

I’ve been reading a lot of books that are incredibly heavy in content as of late, and it was time for a thriller to mix things up – my version of lightening the mood. A.J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window was the perfect book to get me into a different head space. I feel like I understand the place that Finn was coming from in writing an agoraphobic character, and after learning about his life experience it’s easy to see that there is a lot of himself in the book, which I love.

Anna, once a successful child psychologist, is agoraphobic – she cannot leave her apartment. A tragic event is alluded to, but we don’t learn the heartbreaking truth until much later on. Living alone, Anna relies on grocery delivery to take care of her necessities. Anna also relies on her red wine delivery, clearly a little too much. Anna spends time exploring the world through the lens of her camera – her window is her access to an outside she cannot bear to face. When a new family moves in across the street, Anna watches them through her window and soon witnesses a horrific act of violence, forcing her out of her apartment. Anna desperately pleas for the police to investigate the crime, but between her agoraphobia and the wine bottles strewn about her apartment, they police are quick to dismiss her story.

This was a fun and absorbing thriller, but something didn’t fully click for me. I think it just felt sort of familiar – like this has all been done before, many times over. This book certainly follows the Gone Girl trend – lots of twists and turns with an unreliable female narrator. I wish Finn didn’t make Anna a borderline alcoholic – though she suffered tragedy, her agoraphobia would have sufficed as her coping mechanism. Was the alcoholism added in to have the reader question her mental state? I just didn’t see the point. Either way, I had a lot of fun with this book and know it will make a great movie. Finn is a unique guy and I can tell he put a lot of heart into this one, I will certainly pick up his next book. This was about a 3.5 star read for me, but I rounded up 🙂

BOOK REVIEW | Blood Wedding by Pierre Lemaitre

4/5 stars

As far as psychological thrillers go, this one takes the cake. The plot is so twisted that’s it’s hard to say anything without giving too much away. This book gripped me from the first page and kept up the pace right until the end. Pierre Lemaitre, I’m not done with you.

Sophie Duget is starting to forget things. She has been misplacing items, forgetting where she parked her car, and experiencing strange lapses in memory. Her husband, Vincent, is patient, though growing more frustrated as she further unravels. After Vincent’s sudden death (not a spoiler!) and an embarrassing work event, Sophie starts anew as a nanny to a young boy, Leo.

One day, after staying late to care for Leo, Sophie wakes up to find that he has been killed. With no memory of the incident and all signs pointing to her, she flees the scene and goes on the run. After some time, Sophie realizes she must assume a new identity to continue hiding in plain sight. She obtains a new ID and papers, but wants to get married to start her new chapter. She finally meets someone – a little dim but very excited that the beautiful Sophie is interested in him. Let’s just say things get really bizarre from this point on.

All of this cumulates in an over the top, dramatic spectacle, which is too good for words. All in all, this was a fun, suspenseful thriller. It kept me guessing – not because of the “how” but because of the “why”…why are all of these terrible things happening to Sophie? If you enjoy thrillers and are looking for one where you can’t predict the twist, definitely check this out.

BOOK REVIEW | Broken River by J. Robert Lennon

5/5 stars

This book is so unique. It opens with a violent scene: a family in upstate New York is trying to escape from their house with their young daughter in tow. The whole scene is narrated from the perspective of “the observer”, a ghost-like presence that floats in and out throughout the entirety of the book. We do not know what the family is trying to escape, but the husband and wife are murdered as their daughter hides in the woods, leaving the young girl alone. The killers remain on the loose, with the observer being the only witness to the crime.

Over the years, the abandoned house becomes a spot for young lovers to find privacy and eventually for vandals to destroy. Realtors try relentlessly to sell the house – it is renovated beautifully, and then destroyed again. No one wants to buy a house where murders have taken place. After a long vacancy, the house is finally sold, renovations take place yet again, and a new family moves in.

Karl is an overgrown teenager – childish, irresponsible, and unfaithful. His wife Eleanor is a cancer survivor and begrudging, though successful, “chick-lit” novelist who suspects her cancer may have returned. Irina, their adolescent daughter, is witty and wise, brave and insecure, and an aspiring writer as well. Eleanor and Irina take a great interest in their home’s history, unknowingly becoming  apart of its narrative. A local resident, Samantha, soon becomes entwined with the family, culminating in a dramatic denouement.

It’s difficult to put into words that which makes this book so good. I cared about these characters – they are all spiraling in different ways, and I wanted them to wake up. They are messy, real. The omnipresent observer served as a clear vantage point for everything going on – sort of a non-judgemental landing place that helped to piece it all together. This is the sort of book that begs the question: what does it all mean? How much control do we have in our lives? Are we really writing our own narratives? Is everything predetermined? There are no bells or whistles here, just great storytelling and character development. I’ll definitely be checking out Lennon’s other books in 2018.