BOOK REVIEW | The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn

4/5 stars

I’ve been reading a lot of books that are incredibly heavy in content as of late, and it was time for a thriller to mix things up – my version of lightening the mood. A.J. Finn’s The Woman in the Window was the perfect book to get me into a different head space. I feel like I understand the place that Finn was coming from in writing an agoraphobic character, and after learning about his life experience it’s easy to see that there is a lot of himself in the book, which I love.

Anna, once a successful child psychologist, is agoraphobic – she cannot leave her apartment. A tragic event is alluded to, but we don’t learn the heartbreaking truth until much later on. Living alone, Anna relies on grocery delivery to take care of her necessities. Anna also relies on her red wine delivery, clearly a little too much. Anna spends time exploring the world through the lens of her camera – her window is her access to an outside she cannot bear to face. When a new family moves in across the street, Anna watches them through her window and soon witnesses a horrific act of violence, forcing her out of her apartment. Anna desperately pleas for the police to investigate the crime, but between her agoraphobia and the wine bottles strewn about her apartment, they police are quick to dismiss her story.

This was a fun and absorbing thriller, but something didn’t fully click for me. I think it just felt sort of familiar – like this has all been done before, many times over. This book certainly follows the Gone Girl trend – lots of twists and turns with an unreliable female narrator. I wish Finn didn’t make Anna a borderline alcoholic – though she suffered tragedy, her agoraphobia would have sufficed as her coping mechanism. Was the alcoholism added in to have the reader question her mental state? I just didn’t see the point. Either way, I had a lot of fun with this book and know it will make a great movie. Finn is a unique guy and I can tell he put a lot of heart into this one, I will certainly pick up his next book. This was about a 3.5 star read for me, but I rounded up 🙂


BOOK REVIEW | Blood Wedding by Pierre Lemaitre

4/5 stars

As far as psychological thrillers go, this one takes the cake. The plot is so twisted that’s it’s hard to say anything without giving too much away. This book gripped me from the first page and kept up the pace right until the end. Pierre Lemaitre, I’m not done with you.

Sophie Duget is starting to forget things. She has been misplacing items, forgetting where she parked her car, and experiencing strange lapses in memory. Her husband, Vincent, is patient, though growing more frustrated as she further unravels. After Vincent’s sudden death (not a spoiler!) and an embarrassing work event, Sophie starts anew as a nanny to a young boy, Leo.

One day, after staying late to care for Leo, Sophie wakes up to find that he has been killed. With no memory of the incident and all signs pointing to her, she flees the scene and goes on the run. After some time, Sophie realizes she must assume a new identity to continue hiding in plain sight. She obtains a new ID and papers, but wants to get married to start her new chapter. She finally meets someone – a little dim but very excited that the beautiful Sophie is interested in him. Let’s just say things get really bizarre from this point on.

All of this cumulates in an over the top, dramatic spectacle, which is too good for words. All in all, this was a fun, suspenseful thriller. It kept me guessing – not because of the “how” but because of the “why”…why are all of these terrible things happening to Sophie? If you enjoy thrillers and are looking for one where you can’t predict the twist, definitely check this out.

BOOK REVIEW | Broken River by J. Robert Lennon

5/5 stars

This book is so unique. It opens with a violent scene: a family in upstate New York is trying to escape from their house with their young daughter in tow. The whole scene is narrated from the perspective of “the observer”, a ghost-like presence that floats in and out throughout the entirety of the book. We do not know what the family is trying to escape, but the husband and wife are murdered as their daughter hides in the woods, leaving the young girl alone. The killers remain on the loose, with the observer being the only witness to the crime.

Over the years, the abandoned house becomes a spot for young lovers to find privacy and eventually for vandals to destroy. Realtors try relentlessly to sell the house – it is renovated beautifully, and then destroyed again. No one wants to buy a house where murders have taken place. After a long vacancy, the house is finally sold, renovations take place yet again, and a new family moves in.

Karl is an overgrown teenager – childish, irresponsible, and unfaithful. His wife Eleanor is a cancer survivor and begrudging, though successful, “chick-lit” novelist who suspects her cancer may have returned. Irina, their adolescent daughter, is witty and wise, brave and insecure, and an aspiring writer as well. Eleanor and Irina take a great interest in their home’s history, unknowingly becoming  apart of its narrative. A local resident, Samantha, soon becomes entwined with the family, culminating in a dramatic denouement.

It’s difficult to put into words that which makes this book so good. I cared about these characters – they are all spiraling in different ways, and I wanted them to wake up. They are messy, real. The omnipresent observer served as a clear vantage point for everything going on – sort of a non-judgemental landing place that helped to piece it all together. This is the sort of book that begs the question: what does it all mean? How much control do we have in our lives? Are we really writing our own narratives? Is everything predetermined? There are no bells or whistles here, just great storytelling and character development. I’ll definitely be checking out Lennon’s other books in 2018.

BOOK REVIEW | The River at Night by Erica Ferencik

2/5 stars

I didn’t like this book.

Wini, Pia, Sandra, and Rachel are 4 long-time friends, ready to embark on their annual girl’s-trip. When Pia suggests that they go white-water rafting, differences in opinion quickly emerge. There is excitement, trepidation, fear, and uncertainty.

Everything about this book was just sort of OK…I didn’t connect with any of the characters and their tour guide was a cliche of a young, woodsy, hippie type. Worst of all, the scares didn’t scare me. 2 starts for being a wilderness adventure – I love books about surviving the elements.

BOOK REVIEW | Final Girls by Riley Sager

Final Girls by Riley Sager


I’m a huge fan of slasher movies. Huge. For me, the ultimate in horror is a crazed maniac, yielding a knife, hell-bent on plunging it into you. Yet, I love those movies, and with Halloween right around the corner I get giddy with excitement thinking about some of the classic horror I’ll be watching soon – I’m not sure what that says about me. Who is scarier than Michael Myers? No one. The answer is no one. When I heard about Final Girls, a book marketed for fans of slasher films, I knew I would be picking it up as soon as it was released.

This is the story of the last women standing. After any slasher movie style bloody massacre, there is always a single woman who survives. Final Girls seeks to tell the story of three of these women, all who endured, and survived, the unthinkable. Sam, Lisa, and our narrator, Quincy, are bound by their similar experiences, though they all handle the other side of their trauma uniquely.

I liked this book, I really did! I found myself wrapped up in the lives of these women, and it’s an easy story to get lost in. This is a twisty book, but all fairly predictable. I called certain elements right away, though there was one pretty major reveal that I didn’t see coming. Much like many of the thriller / horror books that I have read lately, I didn’t find it scary. I don’t know if it was meant to be scary, but it was a really solid and enjoyable thriller. If you go into this book know that it is not a slasher book, it is a thriller about the women who a massacre.

A fun, engrossing read that fans of thrillers will be sure to enjoy.

BOOK REVIEW | Exquisite by Sarah Stovell

3.5/5 stars

My thoughts:
I’m way behind on reviews, so I am going to jump right into a quick one!

Exquisite is a strange little book – it’s not exactly a thriller, but rather a fast-paced, whirlwind romance with a few thrilling moments and a chilling ending. I didn’t love this book as much as other readers, but I will say I couldn’t put it down! It’s a story of passion and obsession, and how these experiences change the lives of two talented women.

It’s best to go into this book knowing very little, and to simply enjoy the escapism it provides. A fun read that provided a nice bridge between heavier books.

BOOK REVIEW | Into the Water by Paula Hawkins

Into the Water by Paula Hawkins.jpg

2/5 stars

My thoughts:
This is one of the more frustrating books I have read lately. A talented writer with an intriguing plot, and a story bogged down by a ridiculous amount of characters make for a confusing, convoluted read.

A woman is found dead in the river, and shortly after a teenage girl is found in the river as well. Are these deaths suicides, or something more malicious? It’s been said that the river is a place to get rid of difficult women…

I was initially drawn in to this story and the fates of these women, but it quickly started to fall flat. As I mentioned, there are way too many characters in this book, and they are primarily women making it even more difficult to keep everyone straight. A simple character map at the beginning of the book would have helped immensely!

Hawks created a chilling atmosphere that I was so ready to get behind, but I was so disconnected with this story that it just wasn’t enough to save this for me. There are a few notably powerful passages within, but overall, this was a huge disappointment. I wont be comparing this to its blockbuster predecessor, because while I liked that book more, I believe that every novel should be able to stand on its own.

I found that I had to force myself to finish the book, and I considered quitting with just 50 pages left to go. I powered through to the end, but unfortunately it offered nothing much in terms of redemption. Something about seaside / small towns always resonates with me, so 2 stars for a promising concept and great atmosphere.